Frank and Catriona Borman

I am a farmer from Mashonaland East, so as you might guess I live for the outdoors. I am known to spend as much time as possible in the African bush, preferably with my wife Catriona, who works at one of our great schools in Marondera. We share a love for the bush and are both very keen photographers. We spend hours driving around or just sitting at a waterhole in the hope of seeing something worth a picture. We like exploring new and interesting places, always with cameras in hand.

How I Got the Shot: "Shadow Mate"

I took the original shot of the Yellow-billed stork in Mana Pools in mid-October 2017. I had been sitting next to Long Pool for quite some time, watching the pair as they walked and waded together in the shallows often rubbing up against each other and scraping their bills together in a playful manner. They were fascinating in the way they moved together, often in unison and I managed to take quite a number of interesting shots of them.

How I Got the Shot: “Shadow Mate”

I got this shot in May 2017 when we were in Hwange, one of our favourite National Parks in Zimbabwe. We were being spoilt by WEZ with a photographic prize at the Little Makololo Lodge in the Wilderness Safari Area just past Ngweshla.

We had seen a young lion following a herd of buffalos - ever hopeful, but being alone he was very nervous and was stalking but without the needed zest. As we were sitting watching him we noticed a troop of baboons, very nervous and mindful of the lion in their midst.

How I Got the Shot – Painted Reed Frog at Rest

With no travel planned over December, and the Mashonaland Photographic Society deadline looming, I realised I needed to get out and about and make a concerted effort to take some sort of photograph to submit.

I wandered around the garden for hours, looking for insects and bugs. I managed to find a couple of possible entries but nothing that really felt like it would catch the judges’ attention. I also used this time to get to know the Nikon D4 as opposed to the Nikon D7100 I normally use.

GEOLOGY: Walking in the Footprints of Dinosaurs

Discovered by Dr Ali Ait-Kaci, it is the first giant Sauropod footprint found in sub-Saharan Africa. From its massive dimensions of 96 centimetres and absence of the crescent-shaped characteristics of the front legs these are believed to be from the rear legs of Brachiosaurus, a plant eating dinosaur that is thought to have weighed around fifty tonnes.