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Wonders Never Cease.

Footnotes (Blog) / No Comment / 07/06/2018

By Jenny Brown

When travelling, which is something I love to do, I try to be a good “Tommy” tourist but also a good traveller. New places and new experiences are a must for me as travelling from Zimbabwe is so expensive. While I love to see the sights that people write about and recommend I also love to find a local person from that area and ask hin/her to take me to where they socialise, where they eat and so on during their everyday life. It gives one more of a feel about how they really live, survive and entertain.

Of course, this often leads to interesting conversation and great photos. Admittedly, some places can be scary and rundown but that is all part of the deal. I love it.

Our guide on our trip to Morocco was very accommodating, and happy to show us all the places of interest he felt were par of his culture.  On this particular day we were heading towards the Atlas Mountains and onward to the desert. The roads are well maintained so it was easy to travel about. We were heading along at a fair paced when Hechim (our guide) suddenly stopped and said we just had to see the goats.

Goats in the trees © Jenny Brown

Goats in the trees © Jenny Brown

Lo and behold: on this bare open space was an entire herd of goats up the only tree visible for miles.  The shepherd walked up to us with a big toothless smile and promptly handed me one of the kids! It seemed like a natural thing to do, and the animal did not seem to mind at all. Very surprisingly to me he was clean and not smelly – so cute actually! I was expecting him to be full of the red/orange dirt and dust surrounding us.

Jenny with the kid goat ©Jen Brown

Jenny with the kid goat ©Jen Brown

Jen and Robin with the kid goat © Jenny Brown

Jen and Robin with the kid goat © Jenny Brown

We were told the goads climb this and any other trees they might find all by themselves. They then stand on these narrow branches for hours. Don’t ask me how, as I would not be able to do it – perhaps having four legs helps! My husband Robin said that he thought they did this as the ground surrounding them was bare of vegetation, there is no shade and maybe they caught a breeze up high, which would be a relief as the days were unbelievably hot. Made sense to me!

I still came away with wonder, and the feeling that they had been placed there.  I have seen pictures of this scene before, but always thought someone had been clever with the computer. Yet really and truly there they were. Happy days!

How do they balance on those branches? © Jenny Brown

How do they balance on those branches? © Jenny Brown

 

© Jenny Brown

© Jenny Brown

Jenny was born and raised in the farming district of Beatrice in Zimbabwe.  During her childhood and teens Corby Farm was her playground. She went to Beatrice Junior and Queen Elizabeth Senior schools where she studied, played sport and had fun – not necessarily in that order! She completed a secretarial course as her mother did not want her to be a ‘Window Designer’, but it stood her in good stead and she travel extensively for a “Farm Girl” at “that time”.  She has lead a colourful life with many up’s and down but is now happily married to Robin and has a beautiful daughter from a previous marriage.  Jen designs and makes up jewellery and takes her photographs which she sells when and where she can. Time is short now as she is in her 60s, and says she has much to do before she reaches the departure lounge.

To read more about Jen and her photography please visit her blog.

 

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